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Places of interest

Information for attendees

There is much to do in and around Rotterdam. Consider visiting some the places of interest below!

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Take a boat tour
of the Europoort.

Rotterdam's massive port occupies half the city's total area of 247 square kilometers, much of it in turn occupied by Europoort, a huge complex known as the "Gateway to Europe." In addition to countless large freight vessels, you'll see mile after mile of quays and storage facilities built to service the world's busiest port. One of the most popular sightseeing tours of the port area begins at Maeslantkering near Hoek van Holland (Hook of Holland) and includes a close-up look at the city's massive surge barrier. Evening tours are also fun, especially with Rotterdam's most famous landmarks, including the superb Erasmus Bridge, being spectacularly illuminated. 

Peek at the cube houses. 

Rotterdam is home to many fine examples of modern architecture, much of it inspired by the city's waterside setting, as well as a response to the devastation of WWII. Pushing the architectural envelope to the max are the city's famous Cube Houses (Kubuswoningen). Designed by Dutch architect Piet Blom, this block of houses, with their unique cube-shaped upper stories, are clearly visible from a walk through the Old Harbor. One of them, the Show Cube, is open to visitors and contains displays on the design and history of the buildings. An interesting museum dedicated to chess is also located here. 

Rotterdam Architecture
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Walk around the old harbor and marine museums. 

Rotterdam's Old Harbor (Oude Haven), part of the city's revitalized Maritime District, is a boat basin filled with restored historic boats, including houseboats lived in by locals. In good weather, you can sit outside one of the many cafés and restaurants and enjoy people watching or stroll around and watch the boats being painted or repaired. Signs identify the ages of the boats and show pictures of this area in its heyday as a commercial port and shipyard. 

Enjoy international cuisine
at the Market Hall.

Rotterdam's massive port occupies half the city's total area of 247 square kilometers, much of it in turn occupied by Europoort, a huge complex known as the "Gateway to Europe." In addition to countless large freight vessels, you'll see mile after mile of quays and storage facilities built to service the world's busiest port. One of the most popular sightseeing tours of the port area begins at Maeslantkering near Hoek van Holland (Hook of Holland) and includes a close-up look at the city's massive surge barrier. Evening tours are also fun, especially with Rotterdam's most famous landmarks, including the superb Erasmus Bridge, being spectacularly illuminated. 

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Learn about the history at Museum Rotterdam. 

Museum Rotterdam is one of the best places to visit for those wanting to learn more about the history of this fascinating port city. Established in the 1950s, the museum displays a rich collection of documents and artifacts, including artworks from the 17th and 18th centuries. Of these, the most important works are by Dutch painter Pieter de Hooch. More recent history is also featured at the museum's Coolhaven annex. Dedicated to World War II, Museum Rotterdam '40 -'45 NU opened in 2015 and features exhibits relating specifically to the Dutch wartime experience. A notable artifact on display is the original flag of surrender used in May 1940 after the country was invaded by Germany. 

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